Negritude
An Exhibition of African American Art
December 18, 2020 - January 18, 2021

Curator's note

Thank you for viewing the National Alliance of Artists from Historical Black Colleges and Universities’ traveling exhibition from HBCU’s. The organization was founded in 1999 to bring Art and Art Education to the forefront, provide expressive dialogue, opportunities to exhibit and educate the populous through the visual arts. The organization has approximately 90 members representing over 50 black colleges and universities. All artists in the exhibit “negritude” are professional artists and educators who were/or are affiliated with Historical Black Colleges and Universities in the USA.

The exhibition you are viewing includes works from the Harlem Renaissance (1918- to mid 1930s) and the black movements (1950-1960s). All artists represented are in private collections, galleries and museums in the USA.

The legendary artists depicted in the exhibition are from private and institutional collections. These artists are: Alma Woodsey Thomas (1891- 1978), recognized as a major US American painter of the 20th century; Elizabeth Catlett (1915-2012), an American Mexican printmaker, muralist, painter and sculptor; who studied under the famous American artist Grant Woods, her works focuses on mostly black women and their experiences; Claude Clark (1915-2001), painter and printmaker, emphasizes the diaspora of the black American culture, including dances, landscapes, religious and political satire images; Al Hollingsworth (1928- 2000), illustrator and painter was one of the first black artist illustrators in comic books; Jacob Lawrence (1917 – 2000), painter and printmaker works focus on black American historical subjects and contemporary life. Lawrence is considered the most widely acclaimed black American artist of the century, and one of few in standard survey books on American art; Benny Andrews, (1930-2006), painter, printmaker, related his art to the black culture experience; Varnetta Honeywood (1950-2010), painter and printmaker known for her use of color, pattern and texture; and Louis J. Delsarte (1944 – 2020) painter, printmaker, and muralist, is known for his "illusionistic" style.

In general members of the National Alliance of Artists are noted artists who have been taught by recognized post Harlem Renaissance artists and/or have received many honors and rewards for their art, examples of a few represented in the exhibit are: Lee Ransaw, painter and muralist, founder of the National Alliance of Artists, he is included in the Georgia’s History Makers, a recognized published collection of noted African Americans; Dennis Winston, renowned printmaker specializing in woodblock prints; received 2020 Award of Distinction for Printmaking for his woodcut print “Royal Gold” in the 2020 Virginia Artist Annual Exhibition, Hampton, Virginia. The Wilton House Museum in 2021 commissioned Winston to illustrate “Wilton Uncovered: How Archeology Illuminates an Enslaved Community”; renowned Kevin Cole, sculptor and mix media painter, is the recipient of the Georgia Museum of Art “Larry D. and Brenda A. Thompson Award for 2020; Cole and Peggy Blood trained under John Howard who received tutelage under Harlem Renaissance artist Hale Woodruff. Blood was selected as the 2020 artist of the year for the Destig Magazine, and Bryan Wilson is the 2020 recipient of the Elizabeth Greenshields Foundation. It’s Wilson’s second award from the Foundation.

Many NAAHBCU artists have roots in the South and feel strongly about issues that affect everyone such as racial justice, law & order, social welfare, education and Civil Rights. These are dominant issues in the Black community. The National Alliance of Artists from Historical Black colleges are delighted to share visually their expressive deep feelings on these issues.

- Peggy Blood
Distinguished Professor
Fine Arts Humanities and Wellness
Savannah State University

Click to hear Peggy Blood

Co-Curator's note

Almost two years back Dr. Peggy Blood had proposed to bring an exhibition to India with the aim of spreading awareness about African American Art. Wholeheartedly I accepted the proposal and planned to organize the show in five different venues. I was aware of the difficulties on path that I would have to face, but pandemic was something unexpected. The first show was held in Kerala Lalithkala Akademi’s art gallery Darbar hall in Ernakulam and the second was in Bharat kala Bhavan, Varanasi. When the exhibits were on their way to Santiniketan for the next show just then the university was abruptly closed due to pandemic. The exhibits remained stranded in the warehouse of blue dart for few months. At this crucial juncture dr. Siva Kumar requested ms Richa Agrawal to help us. She happily agreed and the exhibits were brought to the gallery. I thank Dr. Sivkumar and Ms. Richa Agrawal for rescuing us. It is a moment of great relief and joy for me to see the art works finally displayed in the gallery where they actually deserve to be.

In this exhibition one can see a wide range of style, medium and thematic content, that is because the art works are spread in the time span of 8-9 decades. This gives us a panoramic view of African American art in 20th and 21st century. The attempt is not only to document the history but also to create a new identity. In this process of creating an identity for Black artists in America they have invoked the legacy of African culture. I am sure the viewers will find the art works engaging.

I thank the entire team at the Kolkatta center for creativity for their immense efforts in organizing the festival.

- Neeta Omprakash
Independent Art Curator


Exhibition note

Negritude, a significant exhibition of Black Art organized by The National Alliance of Artists from Historical Black Colleges and Universities (NAAHBCU), USA, shows the artworks created by the major African American artists. Curated by professor Peggy Blood from Savannah State University, USA and co curated by Neeta Omprakash, Independent art curator. The exhibition explores the black identity in art. Most of the artworks on display are about the contemporary realities seen through the perspective of African American history and experience. The exhibition that encourages the viewers to see Black Art without giving much emphasis on the racial components, aims at enhancing the acceptance of Black Art in the global scene.


Click here to view the walk through of the exhibition 


Artists



Louis Delsarte

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The Trouble I Have Seen
Claude Clark

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Pioneers of the Harlem Renaissance
Ricky N. Calloway

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Passing Through
Peggy Blood

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Foxx Lady and Mr. Hare
Lee Ransaw

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Heading North
Lee Ransaw

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Freedom Morning
Claude Clark

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Asimah
Peggy Blood

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Influence of the Life of Emmitt Louis Till
Philip Dotson

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Maruvian Harvest Mask
Marcella Muhammad

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First Ladies of the MB Church
Johnnie Maberry

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LOVEY TWICE
Elizabeth Catlett

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Women’s Trek
Al Hollingsworth

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The Beginners
Johnnie Maberry

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Yemoja’s Cosmic Gates,1 2-D,
Arthea B. Perry (Onalaja)

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Tribute to Gregory Hines
Cleve Webber

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Diva
Benny Andrews

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Windows
Jacob Lawrence

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Going Home
Dennis R. Winston

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Jazz Homage Series: Improvisation Sampling I
Terrance Robinson

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Glimpse of Jupiter
Alma Woodsey Thomas

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“NINE GOLDEN RINGS”
Vandorn Hinnant

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Marvette Pratt Aldrich

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The Spirit of One Planet for One People
Roymeico A Carter

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Black man Looking Through a White world During the 1960’s Civil right Movement
Willie Hooker

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Thank You_Dr. King
Clarence Talley Sr

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I May Not Get There With You
Clarence Talley Sr

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“Solomon”
Bryan Wilson

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Gossip in the Sanctuary
Varnette Honeywood

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“This IS It!”
Tracie Lee Hawkins

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BS Between Rhyme and Reason II
Kevin Cole

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